Launcher in place

Yesterday the Proton M launch vehicle was transported from our processing facility to Launch Pad 39 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome. It began its trip to the pad at exactly 6:30 a.m., which is a Russian tradition because it corresponds to the time the vehicle for Yuri Gagarin, the first human in space, rolled out to the pad. Most of the team traveled to the pad a few hours after the transportation of the ILV began. We arrived just in time to witness the Russian specialists undertake the monumental task of erecting this huge rocket. Of course, we were not going to miss our chance to take a team photo in front of such an impressive sight. The Orbital, Telenor, ILS and KhSC teams are now completing final closeouts and checks, as well as rehearsing for Sunday’s long-awaited launch of the Proton M/Breeze M and THOR 5. [img]http://www.ilslaunch.com/assets/Images/Media/Thor-5-BLOG/DSC0064small.jpg[/img]

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Fairing well

Since the last update to this blog our team has been extremely busy, as we are growing ever closer to Sunday’s launch of THOR 5. After the spacecraft was mated to the payload adapter (PLA) the Breeze M was moved into position on the tilter stand. Shortly after this occurred, the SC/PLA assembly was moved on top of the Breeze M upper stage, attached, and the whole assembly was tilted from a vertical to a horizontal position. After some testing by Orbital the now-horizontal orbital unit was ready to be encapsulated by the payload fairing. The bottom half was first slid under the orbital unit. Once it was in place the top half of the fairing was gently and expertly picked up off the ground, moved and then placed on top of the unit. This operation was undertaken by not one, but two, Khrunichev (KhSC) crane operators working in tandem with two cranes. After both halves of the fairing were in place KhSC specialists began the process of attaching them to the Breeze M, as well as applying Telenor, Orbital and ILS logos to the fairing. Shortly after they were applied most of the team climbed up a ladder to the logos and left their mark. Some team members signed their names on the logos, while others left wishes for a good flight and an inside joke or two (not to mention a cheer of “Go Giants!”) [img]http://www.ilslaunch.com/assets/Images/Media/Thor-5/028-Gumby2small.jpg[/img] The full assembly of the spacecraft, adapter, Breeze M and fairing is known as the Ascent Unit (AU). With the AU now fully assembled it was ready to be detached from the tilter stand, and lifted (again by tandem Russian crane operators) onto a railcar. The railcar transported the AU out of Processing Hall 101 and moved it to the other side of the building to Hall 111. This hall is where our Proton M rocket has been residing and has undergone testing and preparations for the past many weeks. Shortly after the AU arrived in Hall 111 KhSC began the process of mating it to the Proton M launch vehicle. After this mating of the launch vehicle and AU, we refer to the now nearly complete Proton M as the Integrated Launch Vehicle (ILV). The ILV spent a couple of days inside Hall 111 as closeout operations were being performed and as Orbital conducted some electrical tests to make sure that they could communicate with their spacecraft through the Proton launch vehicle. The ILV is now reaching the final stages of preparations for launch. Yesterday it was moved from Hall 111 to the nearby Breeze M fueling station, where it was to spend two days in order for the Breeze M to be loaded with fuel and oxidizer. As mentioned in a previous post, these fueling days allow most of the team to get some rest. A day off usually means a trip into town, this time was no exception. Yesterday brought a special treat with it in the form of the launch of a Soyuz launch vehicle carrying supplies to the International Space Station. Many of our team were able to witness this successful launch. Tomorrow we will be getting ready to watch our Proton M rocket roll via railcar from the Breeze M fueling station to the launch pad. At around 9:30 a.m. we will all be there to watch it being erected on the pad, and of course we will have our cameras ready for this amazing photo op.

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Media Advisory Available

The official [url=http://www.ilslaunch.com/ils/news-020508/]Media Advisory[/url] has been released for the ILS Proton launch of THOR 5, including satellite coordinates for launch broadcast.

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Joint Operations

Jan. 25 marked a major milestone for the THOR 5 team. Orbital’s propellant team successfully completed loading the spacecraft with hydrazine fuel. This operation took the better part of the day and, because it was potentially hazardous, afforded another day of rest for most of the team. We all look forward to the successful completion of propellant loading operations, not just because it signifies the end of spacecraft standalone operations and a continuing positive progression of the launch campaign, but also because it means we get to throw a Post-Fueling Party. This feast occurred on Jan. 26. The few parties we have throughout the campaign are a great time for team members to relax, cut loose and bond in activities not directly related to the spacecraft or launch vehicle operations. As with any Russian get-together our party was not complete without a number of toasts made by KhSC, ILS and Orbital. Some team members decided to head out early, while the hardiest of us danced away into the night. [img]http://www.ilslaunch.com/assets/Images/Media/Thor-5/PLAmate2small.jpg[/img] Because standalone operations were at an end, we had no choice but to start joint operations on Jan. 28 with the mating of the THOR 5 Spacecraft to the KhSC payload adapter (or PLA). The PLA allows the spacecraft to rest comfortably on top of the Breeze M, which is the upper stage of the Proton M launch vehicle. The PLA also houses the Saab-built separation system, which will gently separate THOR 5 from the Breeze M when it reaches its destined geostationary orbit. Stay tuned for more updates regarding joint operations; including mating the SC/PLA assembly to the Breeze M, and the encapsulation of the whole structure into what we call the Ascent Unit or AU.

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Mission Accomplished

We have confirmation that the fourth, and final, burn sequence has been completed, and the Proton Breeze M carrying THOR 5 has injected the satellite into geostationary orbit. ILS’ mission is now complete. Thank you for joining us for another successful launch! [url=http://www.ilslaunch.com/ils/news-021108/]Click here[/url] for the press release. [url=http://streamvox.streamos.com/vyvx/ils021008/]Full 45-minute launch broadcast[/url] [url=http://www.ilslaunch.com/ils/thor-cbl.wmv]Click to view launch video clip[/url] [url=http://www.ilslaunch.com/news-020508/]Media Advisory[/url]

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Third Burn is Done

The Breeze M has just successfully completed its third burn and shutdown phase, including jettison of the Additional Propellant Tank (APT). Now the space unit enters a long, 5-hour coast phase, and there will be nothing to report during that time. Then things will start happening in rapid sequence – check back later.

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Second Burn Complete

We have just received word that the second burn and shutdown of the Breeze M upper stage occurred successfully. Next up – burn Number 3 and subsequent shutdown, which should be in about two hours from now.

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We have Liftoff!

The ILS Team is proud to announce the successful liftoff of the Proton Breeze M carrying the THOR 5 satellite! Liftoff occurred at 6:34 a.m. EST (5:34 p.m. Baikonur, 11:34 GMT). Proton’s three stages, including payload fairing jettison, have performed flawlessly. The Breeze M upper stage has completed the first of its four burns and is presently in a circular parking orbit. We’ll update this blog and the hotline when we receive confirmation of the Breeze M second burn. That should be in about an hour. [url=http://streamvox.streamos.com/vyvx/ils021008/]Full 45-minute launch broadcast[/url] [url=http://www.ilslaunch.com/ils/thor-cbl.wmv]Click to view launch video clip[/url] [url=http://www.ilslaunch.com/ils/news-020508/]Media Advisory[/url]

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Safety first

This past week the team has been focused on with what we call standalone operations. During this period Orbital conducted mechanical and electrical tests on THOR 5 to confirm that the spacecraft is operational and ready for its trip into orbit. I am pleased to announce that these tests were all completed successfully. THOR 5 is now being readied to have its fuel tanks filled. This is a potentially extremely hazardous operation, for which the very capable Orbital propellant team has been carefully preparing. Before this operation can be undertaken, though, our team was required to evacuate the Processing Facility for the better part of two days. This was because the Breeze M upper stage for this weekend’s Proton mission with the Russian Express satellite was being fueled just outside the facility. So for the safety of the whole team we got a two-day break. Many members used this time off to rest, while others decided to take a trip (or two) into Baikonur Town and to the Yuri Gagarin Museum, on the grounds of the Cosmodrome. Baikonur Town is a very interesting place full of nice people, good food and drink, and bargains to be had for those team members who decided to do a little shopping. With our two-day break coming to a close the whole team must now prepare for fueling THOR 5, which is occur Friday.

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Contact Us!

For the latest news and information, or if you have a question, please email ILS at contactus@ilslaunch.com